Insulation and Weatherization

It’s called weatherization, and it involves insulation and sealing air leaks. Adding insulation is a good place to start, and there are number of green alternatives that can be used, such as cellulose, cotton, foam, and fiberglass. To identify your house’s leaks, contact a professional who will conduct a blower-door test on the home. From there, you can caulk and weatherstrip your way to energy freedom!

Do your research and check out this article on weatherization from Clark Public Utilities, and contact CPU if you need more help deciding what to do.

Keep in mind, too, that Clark Public Utilities offers incentives to help you get energy efficient.

Energy Efficient Window

Before you go about shopping for more efficient windows, make sure your house is weatherized. As far as efficient windows go, there are some things to look for:

  • Energy Star label. Double-paned windows that are labeled Energy Star will save you between 7 and 15 percent more on bills than non-Energy Star products.
  • 30 U-factor or less. The lower the u-factor, the lower the heat loss
  • What kind of frame you want. Vinyl is the most popular nowadays for its low heat transferability and its adaptability, but there are other options.
  • Whether you want coated or inert gas-filled windows. Both will help to increase energy efficiency and reduce harmful ultraviolet rays in your home.
  • If you have more questions, contact Clark Public Utilities Energy Conservation Counselors at 360-992-3355 or contact them through their website.

Paint on Wall

Be sure to choose a paint without volatile organic compounds (VOC’s). Among the VOC’s are formaldehyde, benzene, acetone, and ammonia, all of which contribute to indoor air pollution. They don’t just smell funny–VOC’s are detrimental to our health.

Look for the Green Seal when you’re buying your paints. As an independent non-profit that certifies environmentally-sound, sustainable products. Their list of approved paints can be found here.

Consider buying used paint from Metro Paint. They take leftover paint and remake it in a variety of colors.

Dresser

Clothing—it’s the thing that separates us from the animals (except if you’re wearing zebra print jeggings, then you’re just as ferocious). There are easy ways, though, to reduce your clothing’s negative impact on the environment. Choose:

  • Recycled fabrics
  • Biodegradable dyes
  • Certification for fair labor practices
  • Organic fibers
  • Renewable materials
  • You should avoid clothes that are wrinkle-resistant and that have been treated with chlorine-based bleaches. Of course, there are other (better) options with your clothing than buying new constantly.

Reduce your wardrobe, first and foremost. Look at your dresser or closet: do you really wear everything you own? If you don’t use it, donate it to a Goodwill or secondhand store. Get to the minimum and stay there. And if you find yourself lacking a needed accessory, go back to those same used clothing stores and look for hidden gems. Remember: reduce, reuse, recycle—it works with clothing, too!

Pillow Cases and Bedding

There are some simple choices you can make to be sustainable with your bedding:

  • Find products made without polybrominated diphenyl ethers
  • Find products made locally or within the United States
  • Look for encased products that have reduced chemical exposure
  • Choose natural rather than synthetic fibers
  • Choose natural latex foam
  • You should avoid products that are “wrinkle-resistant” and treated with formaldehyde, which negatively affects human health. Also avoid polyurethane foam and excessive packaging whenever you can.

Pets

We all want to take the best possible care of our families and pets. Keep them in mind when purchasing chemicals and using them to clean the house or take care of the yard. Take a little time to seek out good, healthy alternatives for your home.

  • Insulation and Weatherization

    It’s called weatherization, and it involves insulation and sealing air leaks. Adding insulation is a good place to start, and there are number of green alternatives that can be used, such as cellulose, cotton, foam, and fiberglass. To identify your house’s leaks, contact a professional who will conduct a blower-door test on the home. From there, you can caulk and weatherstrip your way to energy freedom!

    Do your research and check out this article on weatherization from Clark Public Utilities, and contact CPU if you need more help deciding what to do.

    Keep in mind, too, that Clark Public Utilities offers incentives to help you get energy efficient.

  • Energy Efficient Window

    Before you go about shopping for more efficient windows, make sure your house is weatherized. As far as efficient windows go, there are some things to look for:

    • Energy Star label. Double-paned windows that are labeled Energy Star will save you between 7 and 15 percent more on bills than non-Energy Star products.
    • 30 U-factor or less. The lower the u-factor, the lower the heat loss
    • What kind of frame you want. Vinyl is the most popular nowadays for its low heat transferability and its adaptability, but there are other options.
    • Whether you want coated or inert gas-filled windows. Both will help to increase energy efficiency and reduce harmful ultraviolet rays in your home.
    • If you have more questions, contact Clark Public Utilities Energy Conservation Counselors at 360-992-3355 or contact them through their website.
  • Paint on Wall

    Be sure to choose a paint without volatile organic compounds (VOC’s). Among the VOC’s are formaldehyde, benzene, acetone, and ammonia, all of which contribute to indoor air pollution. They don’t just smell funny–VOC’s are detrimental to our health.

    Look for the Green Seal when you’re buying your paints. As an independent non-profit that certifies environmentally-sound, sustainable products. Their list of approved paints can be found here.

    Consider buying used paint from Metro Paint. They take leftover paint and remake it in a variety of colors.

  • Dresser

    Clothing—it’s the thing that separates us from the animals (except if you’re wearing zebra print jeggings, then you’re just as ferocious). There are easy ways, though, to reduce your clothing’s negative impact on the environment. Choose:

    • Recycled fabrics
    • Biodegradable dyes
    • Certification for fair labor practices
    • Organic fibers
    • Renewable materials
    • You should avoid clothes that are wrinkle-resistant and that have been treated with chlorine-based bleaches. Of course, there are other (better) options with your clothing than buying new constantly.

    Reduce your wardrobe, first and foremost. Look at your dresser or closet: do you really wear everything you own? If you don’t use it, donate it to a Goodwill or secondhand store. Get to the minimum and stay there. And if you find yourself lacking a needed accessory, go back to those same used clothing stores and look for hidden gems. Remember: reduce, reuse, recycle—it works with clothing, too!

  • Pillow Cases and Bedding

    There are some simple choices you can make to be sustainable with your bedding:

    • Find products made without polybrominated diphenyl ethers
    • Find products made locally or within the United States
    • Look for encased products that have reduced chemical exposure
    • Choose natural rather than synthetic fibers
    • Choose natural latex foam
    • You should avoid products that are “wrinkle-resistant” and treated with formaldehyde, which negatively affects human health. Also avoid polyurethane foam and excessive packaging whenever you can.
  • Pets

    We all want to take the best possible care of our families and pets. Keep them in mind when purchasing chemicals and using them to clean the house or take care of the yard. Take a little time to seek out good, healthy alternatives for your home.