Green Neighbors Program

The Clark County Green Neighbors Program was developed and is maintained by Clark County Solid Waste and Environmental Outreach to assist citizens with developing more sustainable lifestyles and building a strong environmental community in Clark County. Solid waste regional planning and programs are a cooperative effort of Battle Ground, Camas, Clark County, La Center, Ridgefield, Vancouver, Washougal, and Yacolt. Funding for this project provided by a grant from the Washington State Department of Ecology.

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Contact Details

Call us
(360) 397-2121 x4352

Become a VIP: Volunteer Invasives Patroller!

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Be Proactive! 

 You can help protect the local environment by becoming an Invasive Species Citizen Scientist. This project may be suitable for interested middle and high school students and adults from all walks of life. No prior experience necessary. Get trained, collect data, report your results, and make a difference!

Invasive species are plants and animals not originally found in a given area. They often arrive accidentally transported on the bottom of a shoe, in firewood or packing materials, to name a few. Once established, they can pose a major threat to wildlife, greenspaces, agriculture, and home gardens. Controlling or stopping their spread can be difficult costly and pose can other potential risks to human health and the environment.

Training 

Two 90-minute trainings (via Zoom) are offered to identify three invasive insects and three invasive weeds that threaten Clark County's plant diversity. Attend one or both but you must register separately for each training.

Invasive Plants Training
Monday, June 14, 7 to 8:30 pm

Learn to identify poison hemlock, tansy ragwort and garlic mustard; three noxious weeds in Clark County. 

Invasive Insects Training
Tuesday, June 15 7 to 8:30 pm

Learn to identify emerald ash borer beetle, Asian long horned beetle and spotted lanternfly, three "when-not-if" insects we expect to see in Clark County in the future.

 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email from Zoom containing information about joining the meeting.

Training objectives include:

  1. Understand the impact of invasive plants and insects on our native habitat and agricultural industry.
  2. Identify three invasive plants and three invasive insects already found or expected to arrive in our areas.
  3. Carry out real-world searches for invasive species surveillance and collect reportable data.
  4. Play a role (if specimens are found) in alerting authorities on the presence of noxious plants and may be early detectors of invasive insects.

 Monitoring

After attending the training sessions, volunteers are ready to set out to search for these species.

Volunteers may monitor as few or as many times as they like, visiting the same or a new spot each time.

Early detection of invasive species allows for the ability to track their spread, potentially halting their establishment. Citizen scientists can play an important role in discovering previously undetected individuals or populations and help stop the spread.

Poison hemlock
Tansy ragwort
Garlic mustard
Emerald ash borer beetle. Credit: USDA
Asian longhorned beetle. Credit: USDA
Spotted lanternfly. Credit: USDA
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