Green Neighbors Program

The Clark County Green Neighbors Program was developed and is maintained by Clark County Solid Waste and Environmental Outreach to assist citizens with developing more sustainable lifestyles and building a strong environmental community in Clark County. Solid waste regional planning and programs are a cooperative effort of Battle Ground, Camas, Clark County, La Center, Ridgefield, Vancouver, Washougal, and Yacolt. Funding for this project provided by a grant from the Washington State Department of Ecology.

Clark County makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of the information provided on this web site. However, due to the possibility of transmission errors, HTML browser capabilities, changes made since the last update to the site, etc., neither Clark County, nor any agency, officer, or employee of Clark County warrants the accuracy, reliability, or timeliness of any information published by this system, nor endorses any content, viewpoints, products, or services linked from this system, and shall not be held liable for any losses caused by reliance on the accuracy, reliability, or timeliness of such information. Portions of such information may be incorrect or not current. Any person or entity that relies on any information obtained from this system does so at his or her own risk.

In offering information on the Web, Clark County seeks to balance our requirement for public access with the privacy needs of individual citizens. Information that appears on the Clark County Web site is part of the public record. By law, it is available for public access, whether by telephone request, visiting county offices, or through other means.

This site contains links to other websites. Clark County is not responsible for the privacy practices or the content, accuracy or opinions expressed on such websites, and such websites are not investigated, monitored or checked by us for accuracy or completeness. Inclusion of any linked website on our site does not imply approval or endorsement of the linked website by us.

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Contact Details

Call us
(360) 397-2121 x4352

Disposal

  • Household Hazardous Waste

    Virtually every home contains products that are potentially hazardous if misused or disposed of improperly. Common hazardous products include pesticides, paints, solvents, batteries, thinners, motor oil, antifreeze, and household cleaners. It’s important to know how to handle, store, and purchase these materials to protect the safety and well-being of your family, community and the environment. You should never pour hazardous wastes down the drain, into the stormdrain, or place it in the garbage.

     

    Related articles: Unwanted Medication Disposal | Hazardous Waste Assessment

  • Unwanted Medication Disposal

    Disposal of Unwanted Medications, Sharps and Inhalers

    Safe disposal of unwanted medications is important for the health of our families, our community, and our environment. It is important to keep these substances out of our water. Even going through the water treatment facility, there may be amounts of the medication that make it into our waterways. Flushing these medications down the toilet is not a good option. There are several options for safe disposal in Clark County.

    Prescription drugs are divided into two categories: controlled and non-controlled substances.

    Controlled substances come under the authority of the Drug Enforcement Administration and may include illegal drugs or prescription medications such as pain killers and tranquilizers.

    Non-controlled substances include over-the-counter drugs as well as prescription medications that are not regulated by the Controlled Substances Act. Your pharmacist or doctor can tell you which category a medication falls into. Proper disposal is different depending upon which type of medication you have.

     

    Related articles: Household Hazardous Waste | Recycling A–Z

  • What’s a hazardous product?

    How to identify hazardous products

    Hazardous products such as those mentioned above have the potential to harm people, pets, and wildlife. To identify potentially hazardous products, look for words on the product label such as poison, danger, warning, caution, or flammable. Hazardous products should be taken to special collection facilities for disposal. They should never be thrown in the trash because they can pose threats to public health and the environment. These threats vary according to specific properties of the product.

    Things To Consider When Purchasing Products

    • Before purchasing a product, read the label to get an indication of its properties. Be aware that the word “non-toxic” is an advertising word and has no federal regulatory definition.
    • Choose products with child resistant packaging.
    • Avoid aerosol products when possible. Aerosols disperse substances that can be inhaled deeply into the lungs and absorbed into the bloodstream.
    • Use non-hazardous or less-hazardous alternative products and recipes. One general household cleaner can serve many purposes; you do not need a different product for every cleaning problem.
    • If safer alternatives are not available, buy only the amount you will need. Make sure that you understand what hazards are associated with a product’s use or disposal.
    • Flammable: Can easily be set on fire or ignited.
    • Explosive/reactive: Can detonate or explode through exposure to heat, sudden shock, or pressure.
    • Corrosive/caustic: Can burn and destroy living tissues when brought in contact.
    • Toxic/poisonous: Capable of causing injury or death through ingestion, inhalation, or absorption. Some toxic substances are known to cause cancer, genetic damage, and fetal harm.
    • Radioactive: Can damage and destroy cells and chromosomal material. Radioactive substances are known to cause cancer, mutations, and fetal harm.
    Some materials may exhibit more than one chemical hazard; for example, they might be flammable and toxic or corrosive and combustible.

    Other Types of Household Hazardous Products

    • Medications: Pharmaceutical compounds (i.e., antibiotics, reproductive hormones, and other prescription and nonprescription drugs).
    • Sharps: Hypodermic needles, syringes with needles attached, intravenous (IV) tubing with needles attached, scalpel blades, and lancets.
    • E-waste: Electronic waste such as computers, televisions, monitors, and printers.
    • Fluorescent lights: It is important to properly recycle compact fluorescent lights (cfl) because they contain small amounts of mercury. There are multiple sites for proper disposal of fluorescent bulbs in Clark County. Visit Light Recycle to search for a drop-off location close to you. Clark Public Utilities will take up to six unwanted cfl bulbs and exchange them for one new LED bulb at their local offices.
  • Non-controlled substance disposal

    What is the safest way to dispose of unwanted medications?

    • Take them to the transfer station during special household hazardous waste operating hours
    • Ask your physician if he/she will take them back for safe disposal.
    • Ask your pharmacist if they have a program for safely disposing of unwanted medications.

    Disposal Locations

    Walgreens Pharmacy - Fisher's Landing Store ONLY
    1905 SE 164th Avenue, 360-885-2938
    Open 24 hours, 7 days a week
    Controlled and Non-Controlled Drugs Accepted
    *No Liquids, Lotions, Inhalers, Sharps or Illegal Drugs please

    Central Transfer and Recycling Center
    11034 NE 117th Avenue, Vancouver 360-256-8482
    Friday, Saturday & Sunday, 8am – 4pm

    West Van Materials Recovery Center
    6601 NW Old Lower River Road, Vancouver 360-737-1727
    Friday & Saturday, 8am – 4pm

    Washougal Transfer Station
    4020 S Grant Street, Washougal 360-835-2500
    3rd Saturday of each month, 8am – 4pm

    You should keep the following in mind when transporting unwanted medications for disposal:

    • While it is perfectly acceptable to combine all pills into one resealable plastic bag, if you get pulled over it might be easier to explain if you keep them in the original container with the medication’s name visible.
    • Make sure the container is sealed and does not leak.
    • All patient information is removed or obscured.

    Inhalers

    Inhalers should be taken to the transfer station at the locations and times listed above. You can remove the cartridge from the case, and throw the case in the trash.


  • Safe disposal

    Take it to the transfer station!

    Clark County residents can dispose of household hazardous waste such as paints, pesticides, poisons, automotive fluids and chemicals at the three transfer stations in Clark County on most Fridays and weekends for FREE.

    Residents can drop of household hazardous waste at the following locations and times (business-generated hazardous waste will not be accepted at these sites):

    Central Transfer Center Station
    11034 N.E. 117th Ave.
    (360) 256-8482
    Friday, Saturday, and Sunday: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

    West Van Recovery Center
    6601 N.W. Old Lower River Road
    (360) 737-1727
    Friday and Saturday: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

    Washougal Transfer Station
    4020 S. Grant St
    (360) 835-2500
    Third Saturdays: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

    There are also twelve paint stores in Clark County that accept used or leftover paint:

    • Ace Hardware, 13009 NE Hwy 99, Vancouver
    • Ace Hardward, 1605 W Main Street, Battle Ground
    • Filbin's Ace Hardward, 809 NE Minnehaha St, Vancouver
    • Habitat for Humanity ReStore, 10811 SE Mill Plain Blvd., Vancouver
    • Miller Paint, 14300 NE 20th Ave., Vancouver
    • Miller Paint, 11717 NE 78th Way, Vancouver
    • Miller Paint, 2607 NE Andresen Rd., Vancouver
    • Miller Paint, 111 NE 164th Ave., Vancouver
    • North County Hardware, 40600 NE 221st Ave., Amboy
    • Parkrose Hardware, 16509 SE 1st St., Vancouver
    • Parkrose Hardware, 8000 E Mill Plain Blvd, Vancouver
    • Rodda Paint and Décor, 7723 NE 4th Plain Blvd., Vancouver

    Guidelines for dropping off hazardous waste 

    DO:

    • Keep HHW products separate (do not mix).
    • Bring products in their original containers when possible.
    • Seal products to prevent leaks and spills.
    • Keep products away from the driver and passengers, i.e., in a trunk, truck bed, or trailer.
    • Keep children and pets away from collection sites and events.

    DO NOT:

    • Exceed 25 gallons or 220 pounds of HHW at fixed HHW collection facilities (okay at the satellite collection events)
    • Bring asbestos, explosives/ammunition, or radioactive materials
  • Controlled substance disposal

    Disposal Locations (free of charge):

    Battle Ground Police Department
    507 SW 1ST Street, 360-342-5100
    Monday – Friday, 8am – 5pm

    La Center Police Department
    105 W 5th Street, 360-263-2745
    Monday – Friday, 8am – 5pm

    Camas Police Department
    2100 NE 3rd Avenue, 360-834-4151
    Monday – Friday, 8am – 5pm

    Ridgefield Police Department
    116 North Main, 360-887-3556
    Monday – Friday, 8:30am – 5pm

    Washougal Police Department
    1320 ‘A’ Street, 360-835-8701
    Monday – Friday, 8am – 5pm
    *No Liquids Accepted

    Vancouver Police Department
    West Precinct
    2800 NE Stapleton Road, 360-487-7355
    Monday – Friday, 8am – 5pm
    *No Liquids Accepted

    Vancouver Police Department
    East Precinct
    521 SE 155th Avenue, 360-487-7500
    Monday – Friday, 8am – 5pm
    *No Liquids Accepted

    Walgreens Pharmacy - Fisher's Landing Store ONLY
    1905 SE 164th Avenue, 360-885-2938
    Open 24 hours, 7 days a week
    Controlled and Non-Controlled Drugs Accepted
    *No Liquids, Lotions, Inhalers, Sharps or Illegal Drugs please

    All sharps and inhalers must be taken to the transfer station for disposal (you can check with your doctor or pharmacist for possible alternatives).

    Learn more about sharps disposal

    You should keep the following in mind when transporting unwanted medications for disposal:

    • While it is perfectly acceptable to combine all pills into one resealable plastic bag, if you get pulled over it might be easier to explain if you keep them in the original container with the medication’s name visible.
    • Make sure the container is sealed and does not leak.
    • All patient information is removed or obscured.
  • Sharps disposal

    Sharps (Hypodermic Needles, Syringes and Lancets)

    Used needles and lancets are dangerous because they can injure people and spread germs/disease. Victims of sharps-related injuries face the cost of post-injury testing, disease prevention measures, and counseling, even if no infection or disease was spread.

    Safe disposal options for sharps

    • Use an approved sharps containers. If an approved container is not available, use one with a well-secured lid, preferably a screw top. Rigid plastic containers are best – for example: plastic milk, juice or soft drink bottles. Avoid glass or aluminum. If using a non-approved rigid sharps container, such as an empty 2-liter bottle, please label it: WARNING SHARPS – DO NOT RECYCLE.
    • Never overfill a sharps disposal container. No materials should be sticking out of the top.
    • Never force materials into a sharps container.

    Where to dispose of sharps

    • Drop-off Collection Sites – Sharps users can take their filled sharps containers to any one of three transfer stations in Clark County. There is no cost for this service.
    • Special Waste Pickup Services – Self-injectors can place their used sharps in a special container, similar to a recycler container, and put it outside their home for collection by trained special waste handlers. Some programs require customers to call for pickup, while others offer regular pickup schedules. There is a cost for this service. Visit www.safeneedledisposal.org for further information.
    • Mail Back Programs – Used Sharps are placed in special containers which are mailed to a collection site for proper disposal. Visit www.safeneedledisposal.org for further information. There is a cost for this service.

    Where to take sharps in Clark County

    Central Transfer and Recycling Center
    11034 NE 117th Avenue, Vancouver 360-256-8482
    Monday – Friday, 6am – 6pm
    Saturday & Sunday, 8am – 4pm

    West Van Materials Recovery Center
    6601 NW Old Lower River Road, Vancouver 360-737-1727
    Monday – Friday, 6am – 6pm
    Saturday, 8am – 4pm

    Washougal Transfer Station
    4020 S Grant Street, Washougal 360-835-2500
    Monday – Friday, 7am – 5pm
    Saturday, 8am – 4pm

    Unwanted Medication Collection Events are held twice each year throughout Clark County. For more information call 360-397-2121 ext 4352.

    Download a flyer

     

  • Unwanted medication take-back events

    Upcoming medication take-back event

    Twice yearly, free medication take-back events are held in Clark County. The next event will be held on Saturday, October 28, 2017 from 10am – 2pm. Citizens may drop off any unwanted medications free of charge and no questions asked. Let's work together to keep these substances out of the hands of children and away from our waterways. Events are a partnership of multiple Clark County agencies and the US DEA.

    Download a flyer

    Drop off Locations:

    Battle Ground Police Department
    507 SW 1st Street, Battle Ground

    Kaiser Permanente Cascade Park
    12607 SE Mill Plain Blvd, Vancouver

    PeaceHealth Southwest Urgent Care
    33rd & Main (South Back Lot), Vancouver

    Washougal Silver Star Search and Rescue
    1220 A Street, Washougal

    You should keep the following in mind when transporting unwanted medications for disposal:

    • While it is perfectly acceptable to combine all pills into one resealable plastic bag, if you get pulled over it might be easier to explain if you keep them in the original container with the medication’s name visible.
    • Make sure the container is sealed and does not leak.
    • All patient information is removed or obscured.

    Learn more about sharps disposal