Green Neighbors Program

The Clark County Green Neighbors Program was developed and is maintained by Clark County Solid Waste and Environmental Outreach to assist citizens with developing more sustainable lifestyles and building a strong environmental community in Clark County. Solid waste regional planning and programs are a cooperative effort of Battle Ground, Camas, Clark County, La Center, Ridgefield, Vancouver, Washougal, and Yacolt. Funding for this project provided by a grant from the Washington State Department of Ecology.

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Contact Details

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Energy star

  • Living Room

     

    Ceiling Fan

    A ceiling fan is a magical appliance. During the summer, it creates a wind chill effect and can keep a hot room cool. In the winter, it redistributes warm air that has risen up back down to where the room’s occupants are. Ideally, ceiling fans work best with their blades 7–9 feet above the floor and 10–12 inches below the ceiling. Larger blades will move air better, too. And always look for the Energy Star seal on the appliance—it will definitely save you money over time.

    Energystar TV

    It is important to be a mindful energy consumer with your television. As with all appliances, look for the Energy Star label. These models are, on average, over 40 percent more energy efficient than standard models, and they include everything from standard to the largest flatscreen LCD and plasma models.

    Believe you me, the energy savings make a difference, especially when 39 million televisions shipped to the United States in 2011, and 19 million of these were 40 inches or larger.

    Wood stove

    Burning wood involves some compromises. Modern woodstoves produce much, much less air pollution than older models but they still emit as much as 100 times more pollution than oil or gas furnaces, inside and outside your home. Many people do prefer this type of heat for many reasons including cost and availability of fuel. It does contribute less to global warming than burning fossil fuels. The SW Clean Air Agency has some great information about using your woodstove more efficiently.

    Even better, though, is the pellet stove, which is much cleaner than any woodstove. And because pellets are made from renewable resources (like wood chips and corn husks, and other timber and agricultural waste), they’re usually considered a good environmental choice.

    LED/Halogen Bulbs

    Wherever possible, replace your incandescent lightbulbs with low wattage compact flourescent (CFL) bulbs or, even better, light-emitting diode (LED) bulbs.

    The energy savings are incomparable: A standard 60 watt incandescent bulb provides 13 to 14 lumens per watt, whereas an equivalent CFL provides 55 to 70 lumens per watt and an LED provides 60 to 100 lumens per watt. What’s more is that an LED bulb will last you a long time, some models lasting 25 years. Lighting accounts for 6% of a house’s energy use—CFL and LED bulbs will get you your money’s worth.

    New bulb standards are changing the way you’ll shop for lightbulbs. You used to buy for watts, but now you’ll shop for lumens, which tell us how bright a bulb burns.

    • 100 watt bulbs are about 1600 lumens
    • 75 watt bulbs are about 1100 lumens
    • 60 watt bulbs are about 800 lumens
    • 40 watt bulbs are about 450 lumens

    Thermostat

    Keep your thermostat set to the lowest setting to which you are comfortable. If possible, keep your thermostat to 68 degrees or lower during the heating season. Space heating accounts for 45% of your home’s energy use, so even minor adjustments can go a long way.

    If you think your heating isn’t doing what it should, look around your home to see what may be causing the situation:

    • Insufficient insulation in walls, ceilings, and floors
    • Uninsulated, loose, or leaking furnace ductwork
    • Dirty furnace filters
    • Open fireplaces (more heat is lost up the chimney than into the room)
    • Air leaks around windows, doors, and walls

    Couch

    The three R’s of sustainable furniture—recondition, reuse, and recycle. Look to redo your furniture, buy secondhand, or get creative before buying new.

    Understandably, decor is a little tough when only working with old materials. Fortunately, there are ways to lower the negative impact of the furniture on the environment and your health. Look for the Forest Stewardship Council’s seal, which certifies timber that is cut in an environmentally and socially responsible manner. Greenguard also certifies safe, low-emission products and materials for indoor use, including furniture.

    In general, look for the following sustainable marks of furniture:

    • Paints, stains, and finishes that contain low or no volatile organic compounds
    • Reduced use of glues, sealants, and formaldehyde
    • Natural fabrics, organic cotton, recycled fabric content, and toxin-free upholstery
    • 100% natural latex foam
    • Use of materials that have been and can be recycled
    • Minimal packaging
    • Locally manufactured

    Lightswitch

    Lighting accounts for 6% of a house’s energy use, so it’s simple: turn off the lights when you’re not in the room. You already know that, though. This just Green Neighbors nudging you off that comfy couch to turn off the kitchen light.

    Books

    Like to read? Consider using your local library or used bookstore before purchasing new books. If you haven’t been to the library in awhile, you might be surprised at all the new things they have to offer.

    • Ceiling Fan

      A ceiling fan is a magical appliance. During the summer, it creates a wind chill effect and can keep a hot room cool. In the winter, it redistributes warm air that has risen up back down to where the room’s occupants are. Ideally, ceiling fans work best with their blades 7–9 feet above the floor and 10–12 inches below the ceiling. Larger blades will move air better, too. And always look for the Energy Star seal on the appliance—it will definitely save you money over time.

    • Energystar TV

      It is important to be a mindful energy consumer with your television. As with all appliances, look for the Energy Star label. These models are, on average, over 40 percent more energy efficient than standard models, and they include everything from standard to the largest flatscreen LCD and plasma models.

      Believe you me, the energy savings make a difference, especially when 39 million televisions shipped to the United States in 2011, and 19 million of these were 40 inches or larger.

    • Wood stove

      Burning wood involves some compromises. Modern woodstoves produce much, much less air pollution than older models but they still emit as much as 100 times more pollution than oil or gas furnaces, inside and outside your home. Many people do prefer this type of heat for many reasons including cost and availability of fuel. It does contribute less to global warming than burning fossil fuels. The SW Clean Air Agency has some great information about using your woodstove more efficiently.

      Even better, though, is the pellet stove, which is much cleaner than any woodstove. And because pellets are made from renewable resources (like wood chips and corn husks, and other timber and agricultural waste), they’re usually considered a good environmental choice.

    • LED/Halogen Bulbs

      Wherever possible, replace your incandescent lightbulbs with low wattage compact flourescent (CFL) bulbs or, even better, light-emitting diode (LED) bulbs.

      The energy savings are incomparable: A standard 60 watt incandescent bulb provides 13 to 14 lumens per watt, whereas an equivalent CFL provides 55 to 70 lumens per watt and an LED provides 60 to 100 lumens per watt. What’s more is that an LED bulb will last you a long time, some models lasting 25 years. Lighting accounts for 6% of a house’s energy use—CFL and LED bulbs will get you your money’s worth.

      New bulb standards are changing the way you’ll shop for lightbulbs. You used to buy for watts, but now you’ll shop for lumens, which tell us how bright a bulb burns.

      • 100 watt bulbs are about 1600 lumens
      • 75 watt bulbs are about 1100 lumens
      • 60 watt bulbs are about 800 lumens
      • 40 watt bulbs are about 450 lumens
    • Thermostat

      Keep your thermostat set to the lowest setting to which you are comfortable. If possible, keep your thermostat to 68 degrees or lower during the heating season. Space heating accounts for 45% of your home’s energy use, so even minor adjustments can go a long way.

      If you think your heating isn’t doing what it should, look around your home to see what may be causing the situation:

      • Insufficient insulation in walls, ceilings, and floors
      • Uninsulated, loose, or leaking furnace ductwork
      • Dirty furnace filters
      • Open fireplaces (more heat is lost up the chimney than into the room)
      • Air leaks around windows, doors, and walls
    • Couch

      The three R’s of sustainable furniture—recondition, reuse, and recycle. Look to redo your furniture, buy secondhand, or get creative before buying new.

      Understandably, decor is a little tough when only working with old materials. Fortunately, there are ways to lower the negative impact of the furniture on the environment and your health. Look for the Forest Stewardship Council’s seal, which certifies timber that is cut in an environmentally and socially responsible manner. Greenguard also certifies safe, low-emission products and materials for indoor use, including furniture.

      In general, look for the following sustainable marks of furniture:

      • Paints, stains, and finishes that contain low or no volatile organic compounds
      • Reduced use of glues, sealants, and formaldehyde
      • Natural fabrics, organic cotton, recycled fabric content, and toxin-free upholstery
      • 100% natural latex foam
      • Use of materials that have been and can be recycled
      • Minimal packaging
      • Locally manufactured
    • Lightswitch

      Lighting accounts for 6% of a house’s energy use, so it’s simple: turn off the lights when you’re not in the room. You already know that, though. This just Green Neighbors nudging you off that comfy couch to turn off the kitchen light.

    • Books

      Like to read? Consider using your local library or used bookstore before purchasing new books. If you haven’t been to the library in awhile, you might be surprised at all the new things they have to offer.

    • Kitchen

       

      Fridge

      Week after week, we buy many food items that we never eat. So they sit in the fridge, grow a bit of mold, get stale or outdated, and we throw them out. Know your eating habits so that you only buy what you need and eat what you buy.

      As for that fridge, we can’t stress Energy Star enough. They’re required to use 20% less energy than unlabeled models. Fridges are among the biggest energy users within your home, so investing in an efficient machine will save energy and money for years to come.

      Food Scraps and Vermicomposting

      In Clark County, we bury around 45,000 tons of food waste each year—that accounts for 16.3% of our total waste! We can reduce that amount easily by setting out that food to compost. Or, if you’re looking for something you can do indoors, you can always use worms.

      Vermicomposting is fantastic if you don’t have a yard to build a regular compost pile with. Home vermicomposting systems generally use one earthworm species, the “redworm,” Eisenia fetida. You can use any opaque, nontoxic materials to house the worms. Makes sure the bin is not more than 18 to 24 inches deep, and a good rule of thumb is that you’ll need one square foot of bin for every pound food waste per week. You’ll have to do some initial tweaking with worms and material, but soon enough you’ll have a self-sustaining colony of gardening friends!

      With composting, it’s a try-and-try-again process, but you can learn more about composting and the Master Composter/Recycler program.

      Jars in Cupboard

      Having a set of jars around the house is a blessing to waste reduction. Take your jars to the store or farmers’ market and fill them up with goods. This way, you can cut out the unnecessary packaging that goes along with many of our groceries.

      You may be denied a jar-filling at the store—when shopping at the deli counter, for instance—because it’s against “health and safety regulations.” However, most managers will agree that there are no health and safety violations in wanting to jar your food. So if at first you don’t succeed, ask for the manager and try, try again!

      (It also helps if, when you are handing jars to the employees, to act as if you had done this a thousand times before. Since that makes jars feel like a common practice in the grocery store, the employee will have less doubt about this “abnormal” practice. It takes a little bit of courage at first, but you’ll get used pretty quickly to living sustainably!)

      Reusable Water Bottle and Coffee Mug

      Getting rid of that unnecessary kitchen waste—it’s easier than you might think. Think of how many bottles and cans you use each week, and imagine how many of those containers you can replace with washable, reusable items.

      Kitchen sink

      Attach a water efficient aerator to your faucet to save water, increase spray velocity, and reduce wasteful splash.

      Be concerned also with what you pour down the drain. Do not pour grease of any sort down your drain—it will eventually clog your pipe and leave you with an annoying problem. Avoid putting down any food scraps, medications, and paper products, too, as basically anything beside water and soap is undesirable in the water system.

      Dishwasher

      Fill your dishwasher to the brim each time you run it. Most of the energy used in your dishwasher comes from heating water; as such, not all loads are created equal. Running one full load will still save more energy than two half loads. And remember, always go with an Energy Star approved appliance. It’ll save you BIG on resources—41% on energy, 30% on water—and your bills.

      And a word on your soaps: use non-toxic, biodegradable soaps that do not contain chlorine or phosphates. What goes down your drain doesn’t simply go away. By making a conscious choice to use non-lasting chemicals, we can save our waters a heap of trouble.

      Handtowel

      Be sure to look for cloth towels instead of your paper towels. They’re washable and perfectly reusable—you can even make them with old clothing and cloth.

      For the optimal reusable cleaning cloth, though, look for microfiber cloths. Due to its ability to hold more than eight times its weight in water, absorb oils, reduce bacteria by 99%, and leave no residue, it is considered a much better cleaner than conventional cloths. Add on its long life and its effortless cleaning ability, it becomes a no-brainer for many homes.

      Produce

      Globalized food production has been a boon to many, but its cost on the environment, society, and cultures remains too high. Buy local to support farmers near your home, to reduce the energy use in shipping your food, and to get the freshest food available. Buy organics to fight against harmful pesticides, hormones, and antibiotics in agriculture. Buy fair trade to promote good pay for the people who harvest your food. Buy the produce itself, without any packaging, to reduce your consumption of resources.

      Even better, though, is not buying your produce! Grow your food from your own backyard. Look to your garden for fresh veggies and fruit, to starting up a beehive for honey, or to raising chickens.

      If eating sustainably had to be summed up, it would be: Know where your food came from and where it is going. All with you, waste can begin and end.

      Reusable Bag

      There’s a reason why other countries impose taxes on plastic bags: they only end up in the garbage. They can’t be recycled (and they shouldn’t be—they clog up the recycling center’s sorting machines), and they can only be reused so many times before they go kaput.

      Life can be made so much simpler when you get a reusable bag! No more plastic bags or even paper bags! You can use the cloth bag for all your carrying needs: the library, work, small children…the possibilities are endless, and you only need to wash it now and then to make it last.

      Tiles on Kitchen Floor

      Makes sure what you’re walking on is made to last. Your flooring—in how it’s made, how long it lasts—can make a big difference beyond your kitchen or living room.

      Bamboo floors are a good idea—fast-growing bamboo, like wood, is anti-bacterial, long-lasting, and easy to install. Linoleum and cork are other good, sustainable floorings, and there are many other options to explore. Do your research before and know what will work for your home and help out the world.

      • Fridge

        Week after week, we buy many food items that we never eat. So they sit in the fridge, grow a bit of mold, get stale or outdated, and we throw them out. Know your eating habits so that you only buy what you need and eat what you buy.

        As for that fridge, we can’t stress Energy Star enough. They’re required to use 20% less energy than unlabeled models. Fridges are among the biggest energy users within your home, so investing in an efficient machine will save energy and money for years to come.

      • Food Scraps and Vermicomposting

        In Clark County, we bury around 45,000 tons of food waste each year—that accounts for 16.3% of our total waste! We can reduce that amount easily by setting out that food to compost. Or, if you’re looking for something you can do indoors, you can always use worms.

        Vermicomposting is fantastic if you don’t have a yard to build a regular compost pile with. Home vermicomposting systems generally use one earthworm species, the “redworm,” Eisenia fetida. You can use any opaque, nontoxic materials to house the worms. Makes sure the bin is not more than 18 to 24 inches deep, and a good rule of thumb is that you’ll need one square foot of bin for every pound food waste per week. You’ll have to do some initial tweaking with worms and material, but soon enough you’ll have a self-sustaining colony of gardening friends!

        With composting, it’s a try-and-try-again process, but you can learn more about composting and the Master Composter/Recycler program.

      • Jars in Cupboard

        Having a set of jars around the house is a blessing to waste reduction. Take your jars to the store or farmers’ market and fill them up with goods. This way, you can cut out the unnecessary packaging that goes along with many of our groceries.

        You may be denied a jar-filling at the store—when shopping at the deli counter, for instance—because it’s against “health and safety regulations.” However, most managers will agree that there are no health and safety violations in wanting to jar your food. So if at first you don’t succeed, ask for the manager and try, try again!

        (It also helps if, when you are handing jars to the employees, to act as if you had done this a thousand times before. Since that makes jars feel like a common practice in the grocery store, the employee will have less doubt about this “abnormal” practice. It takes a little bit of courage at first, but you’ll get used pretty quickly to living sustainably!)

      • Reusable Water Bottle and Coffee Mug

        Getting rid of that unnecessary kitchen waste—it’s easier than you might think. Think of how many bottles and cans you use each week, and imagine how many of those containers you can replace with washable, reusable items.

      • Kitchen sink

        Attach a water efficient aerator to your faucet to save water, increase spray velocity, and reduce wasteful splash.

        Be concerned also with what you pour down the drain. Do not pour grease of any sort down your drain—it will eventually clog your pipe and leave you with an annoying problem. Avoid putting down any food scraps, medications, and paper products, too, as basically anything beside water and soap is undesirable in the water system.

      • Dishwasher

        Fill your dishwasher to the brim each time you run it. Most of the energy used in your dishwasher comes from heating water; as such, not all loads are created equal. Running one full load will still save more energy than two half loads. And remember, always go with an Energy Star approved appliance. It’ll save you BIG on resources—41% on energy, 30% on water—and your bills.

        And a word on your soaps: use non-toxic, biodegradable soaps that do not contain chlorine or phosphates. What goes down your drain doesn’t simply go away. By making a conscious choice to use non-lasting chemicals, we can save our waters a heap of trouble.

      • Handtowel

        Be sure to look for cloth towels instead of your paper towels. They’re washable and perfectly reusable—you can even make them with old clothing and cloth.

        For the optimal reusable cleaning cloth, though, look for microfiber cloths. Due to its ability to hold more than eight times its weight in water, absorb oils, reduce bacteria by 99%, and leave no residue, it is considered a much better cleaner than conventional cloths. Add on its long life and its effortless cleaning ability, it becomes a no-brainer for many homes.

      • Produce

        Globalized food production has been a boon to many, but its cost on the environment, society, and cultures remains too high. Buy local to support farmers near your home, to reduce the energy use in shipping your food, and to get the freshest food available. Buy organics to fight against harmful pesticides, hormones, and antibiotics in agriculture. Buy fair trade to promote good pay for the people who harvest your food. Buy the produce itself, without any packaging, to reduce your consumption of resources.

        Even better, though, is not buying your produce! Grow your food from your own backyard. Look to your garden for fresh veggies and fruit, to starting up a beehive for honey, or to raising chickens.

        If eating sustainably had to be summed up, it would be: Know where your food came from and where it is going. All with you, waste can begin and end.

      • Reusable Bag

        There’s a reason why other countries impose taxes on plastic bags: they only end up in the garbage. They can’t be recycled (and they shouldn’t be—they clog up the recycling center’s sorting machines), and they can only be reused so many times before they go kaput.

        Life can be made so much simpler when you get a reusable bag! No more plastic bags or even paper bags! You can use the cloth bag for all your carrying needs: the library, work, small children…the possibilities are endless, and you only need to wash it now and then to make it last.

      • Tiles on Kitchen Floor

        Makes sure what you’re walking on is made to last. Your flooring—in how it’s made, how long it lasts—can make a big difference beyond your kitchen or living room.

        Bamboo floors are a good idea—fast-growing bamboo, like wood, is anti-bacterial, long-lasting, and easy to install. Linoleum and cork are other good, sustainable floorings, and there are many other options to explore. Do your research before and know what will work for your home and help out the world.

      • Basement

         

        Laundry Soap

        There can be harmful chemicals and phosphates in your laundry soap so be sure to do some research and choose your products wisely. There are a number of safe and healthy products on the market.

        Canned Goods

        Raise your own fruits and veggies or buy local. Either way you’ll have a better idea of where they come from, what has been sprayed on them and they will be so much fresher. Check with the Master Food Preserver Program at WSU Extension, 360-397-6060 if you want to learn more.

        Furnace/Heater

        Many of our homes run on natural gas, electrical, or oil furnaces. If you have an older furnace, just remember to change your filter monthly. And if you’re in the market for a new furnace, look for the Energy Star seal, which signifies a higher AFUE (Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency) rating. The AFUE rating is represented as a percentage. A 90 to 95 percent rating will be what you’re looking for in this market (of course, the higher the rating, the better). More information about heating and cooling systems is available on the Clark Public Utilities website, as well as a Heating Comparison Calculator.

        Dryer Sheets and Detergent

        Manufacturers are not required by law to disclose the ingredients used in artificial fragrances. The result: your laundry becomes a bed of volatile organic compounds (VOC), including several hazardous air pollutants. Two of the chemicals commonly found in dryer sheets—acetaldehyde and benzene—are classified by the Environmental Protection Agency as carcinogens.

        Be mindful of what you are using to wash and dry your clothes. These products affect not only personal health, but air quality and water quality as well. Use products without any fragrance or scent to avoid these unregulated health hazards.

        If you must have a pleasurable scent, toss a bit of lavender or a few drops of essential oil on a reusable cloth into the dryer before you run it.

        And if you must have soft clothes, add ½ cup of baking soda in with the detergent during the wash cycle. Adding ½ cup of vinegar into the fabric softener container should do the trick, too.

        Washer and Dryer

        According to Energy Star, the average American family washes 300 loads of laundry each year—that adds up to a lot of water and a lot of energy. The average Energy Star washer uses 50% less water and 37% less energy than standard washers. Also consider converting to a front-loading washer, which uses about 70% less water than its older top-loading cousin.

        There are some easy tips for keeping your laundry costs down:
        • Wash your clothes in cold water using cold water detergents whenever possible
        • Wash and dry full loads
        • Don’t over-dry your clothes
        • Clean the lint screen in the dryer after every load to improve air circulation and prevent fire hazards
        • Even clean beneath and around the lint screen with a vacuum occasionally
        • Use the cool-down cycle and moisture sensors on your dryer to save heat in drying
        • Schedule every now and then an inspection for your dryer vent. Make sure it is not blocked—it will save energy and may prevent a fire.
        • If nothing else, consider air-drying your clothes on a line or drying rack. That way, you’re only using your arms’ energy and the magic of open air.
        • Laundry Soap

          There can be harmful chemicals and phosphates in your laundry soap so be sure to do some research and choose your products wisely. There are a number of safe and healthy products on the market.

        • Canned Goods

          Raise your own fruits and veggies or buy local. Either way you’ll have a better idea of where they come from, what has been sprayed on them and they will be so much fresher. Check with the Master Food Preserver Program at WSU Extension, 360-397-6060 if you want to learn more.

        • Furnace/Heater

          Many of our homes run on natural gas, electrical, or oil furnaces. If you have an older furnace, just remember to change your filter monthly. And if you’re in the market for a new furnace, look for the Energy Star seal, which signifies a higher AFUE (Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency) rating. The AFUE rating is represented as a percentage. A 90 to 95 percent rating will be what you’re looking for in this market (of course, the higher the rating, the better). More information about heating and cooling systems is available on the Clark Public Utilities website, as well as a Heating Comparison Calculator.

        • Dryer Sheets and Detergent

          Manufacturers are not required by law to disclose the ingredients used in artificial fragrances. The result: your laundry becomes a bed of volatile organic compounds (VOC), including several hazardous air pollutants. Two of the chemicals commonly found in dryer sheets—acetaldehyde and benzene—are classified by the Environmental Protection Agency as carcinogens.

          Be mindful of what you are using to wash and dry your clothes. These products affect not only personal health, but air quality and water quality as well. Use products without any fragrance or scent to avoid these unregulated health hazards.

          If you must have a pleasurable scent, toss a bit of lavender or a few drops of essential oil on a reusable cloth into the dryer before you run it.

          And if you must have soft clothes, add ½ cup of baking soda in with the detergent during the wash cycle. Adding ½ cup of vinegar into the fabric softener container should do the trick, too.

        • Washer and Dryer

          According to Energy Star, the average American family washes 300 loads of laundry each year—that adds up to a lot of water and a lot of energy. The average Energy Star washer uses 50% less water and 37% less energy than standard washers. Also consider converting to a front-loading washer, which uses about 70% less water than its older top-loading cousin.

          There are some easy tips for keeping your laundry costs down:
          • Wash your clothes in cold water using cold water detergents whenever possible
          • Wash and dry full loads
          • Don’t over-dry your clothes
          • Clean the lint screen in the dryer after every load to improve air circulation and prevent fire hazards
          • Even clean beneath and around the lint screen with a vacuum occasionally
          • Use the cool-down cycle and moisture sensors on your dryer to save heat in drying
          • Schedule every now and then an inspection for your dryer vent. Make sure it is not blocked—it will save energy and may prevent a fire.
          • If nothing else, consider air-drying your clothes on a line or drying rack. That way, you’re only using your arms’ energy and the magic of open air.

        • Energy Efficiency

          Keeping our homes efficient isn’t just about using resources wisely. It could also mean financial savings. Just changing the bulbs we use could reduce the electricity bill. Adjusting the setting on the hot water heater and affects both our energy usage and our pocket books. Whether you’re looking for long-term energy efficiency projects or quick tips, take a look at all our tips and resources.

          Efficient Home

          Your house is a system. How and where it sits on the property, known as ‘siting’, determines how it will be affected by the seasons and weather. The walls, roof, floor, windows, doors, and insulation make up the envelope of the structure. The heating and cooling, ventilation, and ductwork should work well separately and together for optimal performance. For many tips on these individual systems and household appliances, check out services & resources or home assessments.

           

          Related articles: Home Assessments | Transportation

        • Rebates & tax credits

          There are many government energy rebates, energy tax credits and financing options, including ENERGY STAR rebates for appliances in Clark County, WA. Taking advantage of this information can help make your home energy efficient without having to pay full price.

          Have a project in mind? Find the right contractor on Clark Public Utilities’ contractor network webpage.

          Read more

          energy efficiency rebates article

          12 Rebates, Tax Credits, and other Incentives to Take Advantage of:

          • Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program with Clark Public Utilities: Rebates from $25 to $1500 for refrigerators/freezers (and recycling), ENERGY STAR clothes washers, light fixtures, solar water heaters, ENERGY STAR heat pumps, windows, insulation and duct/air sealing.
          • Residential Weatherization Incentive Program with Clark Public Utilities: Incentives for weatherization, duct sealing, attic/wall/floor insulation, and windows.
          • Residential Heat Pump Incentive Program with Clark Public Utilities: Rebates for air source heat pumps from $250-750 and Loans for air source heat pump installations ($20,000) at a 3.5 percent interest rate over seven years.
          • Solar Energy Equipment Loan with Clark Public Utilities: Loans for solar pool and water heaters at $10,000 and solar panels at $30,000, at a 5.25 percent rate.
          • Solar Water Heater Rebate with Clark Public Utilities: Rebates for solar water heaters at $500. Must have electric water heater. Loans also available.
          • pdfRenewableEnergyFactSheet.pdf with Washington State Department of Revenue: Solar/wind power and anaerobic digesters at $0.12-$0.54/kWh up to $5,000/year.
          • Residential Renewable Energy Tax Credit with the US Government: Federal tax credit of 30 percent of cost for solar panels, wind energy, solar water heaters, geothermal heat pumps and fuel cells.
          • Energy-Efficient Mortgages with the US Government: Loans from FHA, VA and other lenders for energy efficiency upgrades and renewable energy upgrades like solar panels and passive solar space heaters.
            USDA - High Energy Cost Grant Program with the US Government: Grants for energy generation, transmission and distribution facilities in rural communities.
          • See also pdfWashington Cash Incentives with NW Natural for insulation, windows, sealing air leaks, gas furnace, and more.

          Rebates and incentives from utilities for efficiency are not taxable, per the IRS: